Emu Creek Station, Western Australia.

The missus and I had a very loose itinerary for our 10 day road trip together around parts of Western Australia; on the definite list were the stromatolites, the Pinnacles, and hot-air ballooning (see previous blog posts). We made no reservations, kept the fuel tank above 1/2 full, sort of looked at maps (some were very poor, some excellent), and just drove and enjoyed the scenery and each other immensely. On one leg of the journey the day was fast-moving toward night and we needed to find somewhere to sleep for the evening. We did not take tents or blankets so some shelter was necessary due to it being deep winter when we were there. Allison was analysing the road atlas when she said, “We have two accommodation options available. The first is a caravan park (a good option if their furnished vans aren’t already rented), the second is a “station”.” In Australia a station, when used in rural terms, is a large property (ranch in the USA). This particular station, Emu Creek Station http://www.emucreekstation.com/   is relatively small for the region  – approximately 330,000 acres. I was instantly keen on the homestead stay at the station and the missus was enchanted by the idea.

We arrived unannounced just prior to dusk, were welcomed very kindly, conducted a brief business discussion and then excused ourselves to run down to the river to shoot some photo’s in the stunning light. What a bloody beautiful place this is. We shot a few images then returned to the homestead and enjoyed freshly made sausages, home-grown steaks, fresh made bread, delicious sides, and lovely company – dining with the owners and staff.  https://www.facebook.com/pages/Emu-Creek-Outback-Station-Stays/10150102321265483

Later that night I took a few night shots before retiring for the evening. Early the next morning was exquisite and the missus and I went for a walk and captured a few more images before returning for a lovely brekky and then heading out as we had to be back in Perth to drop off the rental car, pick up a scientific instrument for the missus’ upcoming research expedition on the Indian Ocean, and then, regretfully, get me back on the plane to Texas for work.

Should you find yourself in the Pilbarra region I thoroughly recommend you stay at Emu Creek Station and enjoy the hospitality of  Kylie and John Boyle and the staff.

We sure hope to return, only this time staying for a week or more to capture more of this beautiful place. I would thoroughly enjoy capturing the transition into “the wet” starting October’ish each year – this is monsoonal country. Hope you enjoy these photo’s, all of which are from around the homestead.

These images are all © Andrew and Allison McInnes/2AM Photography. All rights reserved.
To purchase please visit my website: http://andrew-mcinnes.artistwebsites.com/

The homestead bathed in soft pastel light.

Emu Creek Station 2AM-111414
Canon 7D with Canon 24-105mm f/4 lens at ISO 200.
© Andrew and Allison McInnes/2AM Photography. All rights reserved.

The next series of images are sequenced to illustrate the vitalness of water and the transition from pasture to riparian areas; each image will take you closer and closer to the permanent water-hole in the river until, finally, you can immerse yourself in the freshness of life’s liquid – vicariously at least.

Emu Creek Station 2AM-111436
Canon 7D with Canon 24-105mm f/4 lens at ISO 200.
© Andrew and Allison McInnes/2AM Photography. All rights reserved.

 

Emu Creek Station 2AM-29549
Canon 30D with Canon 100-400mm f/4.5 -5.6 lens at ISO 800.
© Andrew and Allison McInnes/2AM Photography. All rights reserved.

 

Emu Creek Station 2AM-29453
Canon 30D with Canon 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 lens at ISO 640.
© Andrew and Allison McInnes/2AM Photography. All rights reserved.

 

Emu Creek Station 2AM-29441
Canon 30D with Canon 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 lens at ISO 640.
© Andrew and Allison McInnes/2AM Photography. All rights reserved.

 

Emu Creek Station 2AM-29495
Canon 30D with Canon 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 lens at ISO 500.
© Andrew and Allison McInnes/2AM Photography. All rights reserved.

 

I just love the flora of Australia and I thought these White River Gums to be fascinating.

Emu Creek Station 2AM-29490
Canon 30D with Canon 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 lens at ISO 500.
© Andrew and Allison McInnes/2AM Photography. All rights reserved.

 

Emu Creek Station 2AM-29536
Canon 30D with Canon 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 lens at ISO 800.
© Andrew and Allison McInnes/2AM Photography. All rights reserved.

 

Emu Creek Station 2AM-29539
Canon 30D with Canon 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 lens at ISO 800.
© Andrew and Allison McInnes/2AM Photography. All rights reserved.

 

Emu Creek Station 2AM-111376
Canon 7D with Canon 24-105mm f/4 lens at ISO 400.
© Andrew and Allison McInnes/2AM Photography. All rights reserved.

 

Typically I would not post such similar images as these two (above and below). However, experiencing the evening and the vista, I had distinctly different, yet very similar “feelings” when viewing this/these scenes. As such I am posting both as stand-alone images. Do you have a preference?

 

Emu Creek Station 2AM-111381
Canon 7D with Canon 24-105mm f/4 lens at ISO 100.
© Andrew and Allison McInnes/2AM Photography. All rights reserved.

 

Emu Creek Station 2AM-111424
Canon 7D with Canon 24-105mm f/4 lens at ISO 200.
© Andrew and Allison McInnes/2AM Photography. All rights reserved.

 

Emu Creek Station 2AM-111426
Canon 7D with Canon 24-105mm f/4 lens at ISO 200.
© Andrew and Allison McInnes/2AM Photography. All rights reserved.

 

Emu Creek Station 2AM-111427
Canon 7D with Canon 24-105mm f/4 lens at ISO 200.
© Andrew and Allison McInnes/2AM Photography. All rights reserved.

 

Emu Creek Station 2AM-111439
Canon 7D with Canon 24-105mm f/4 lens at ISO 200.
© Andrew and Allison McInnes/2AM Photography. All rights reserved.

 

An alternative to homestead stays, there are numerous camping opportunities along the river; here is a sample camp-site (and the billy is on the boil).

Emu Creek Station 2AM-29558
Canon 30D with Canon 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 lens at ISO 800.
© Andrew and Allison McInnes/2AM Photography. All rights reserved.

 

Emu Creek Station 2AM-111402
Canon 7D with Canon 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 lens at ISO 400.
© Andrew and Allison McInnes/2AM Photography. All rights reserved.

 

Emu Creek Station 2AM-111406
Canon 7D with Canon 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 lens at ISO 400.
© Andrew and Allison McInnes/2AM Photography. All rights reserved.

 

Ava good night 😉

 

 

 

“Photo’s from Perth.” Western Australia.

This is  a “botanical” looking photo-blog – I am drawn to the fascinating textures and intricacies of the flora found in Australia and the apparent contrast of coarse vs. delicate. All these images, excepting the view of the city, were taken at Kings Park, Perth.  http://www.bgpa.wa.gov.au/kings-park/

This is in no way presented as a thorough representation of the vast floral variety of Western Australia, let alone the whole continent.

All images are Copyright © Andrew and Allison McInnes/2AM Photography. All rights reserved.

 

Downtown Perth and the Swan River.
Viewed from South Perth.
Canon 7D with Canon EF24-105mm f/4 lens.
Copyright © Andrew and Allison McInnes/2AM Photography. All rights reserved.

 

Resplendent, ripe, and rough.

Ashby’s Banksia 2AM-29084.
Kings Park, Perth.
Canon 30D with Canon 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 lens.
© Andrew and Allison McInnes/2AM Photography. All rights reserved.

 

This Hooker’s Banksia flower is yet to open and reveal its intricate nectar laden bounty.

Hooker’s Banksia 2AM-110782
Kings Park, Perth.
Canon 7D with Canon 24-105mm f/4 lens.
 © Andrew and Allison McInnes/2AM Photography. All rights reserved.

 

This Hooker’s Banksia flower has commenced its “great reveal.”

Hooker’s Banksia 2AM-110783
Kings Park, Perth.
Canon 7D with Canon 24-105mm f/4 lens.
© Andrew and Allison McInnes/2AM Photography. All rights reserved.

 

Woolly Orange Banksia 2AM-110785.
Kings Park, Perth.
Canon 7D with Canon 24-105mm f/4 lens.
© Andrew and Allison McInnes/2AM Photography. All rights reserved.

 

Each of these “toes” will present a beautiful flower soon after this stage of development.

Kangaroo Paw 2AM-110812
Kings Park, Perth.
Canon 30D with Canon 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 lens.
© Andrew and Allison McInnes/2AM Photography. All rights reserved.

 

Not a masterpiece, just found this to be interesting.

Karri Bark (Texture and Shadow) 2AM-29056.
Kings Park, Perth.
Canon 30D with Canon 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 lens.
© Andrew and Allison McInnes/2AM Photography. All rights reserved.

 

There is “liquid gold” in there.

Mallee Eucalyptus 2AM-110900.
Kings Park, Perth.
Canon 7D with Canon 24-105mm f/4 lens.
© Andrew and Allison McInnes/2AM Photography. All rights reserved.

 

Aptly named flower/plant I thought: “Prickly Toothbrushes.”

Prickly Toothbrushes 2AM-29205.
Kings Park, Perth.
Canon 30D with Canon 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 lens.
© Andrew and Allison McInnes/2AM Photography. All rights reserved.

 

This Red Wattlebird is among a Pouched Grevillea plant.

Red Wattlebird 2AM-29142.
Kings Park, Perth.
Canon 30D with Canon 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 lens.
© Andrew and Allison McInnes/2AM Photography. All rights reserved.

 

There are no hummingbirds in Australia. Instead, along with copious insects there are numerous bird families/species which appear to occupy that niche – the Red Wattlebird is but one.

Red Wattlebird 2AM-29150.
Kings Park, Perth.
Canon 30D with Canon 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 lens.
© Andrew and Allison McInnes/2AM Photography. All rights reserved.

 

“Silver Princess” flowers in development. I can “feel” why it is named so – hope you can too.

Silver Princess 2AM-29211.
(of the Eucalyptus genus)
Kings Park, Perth.
Canon 30D with Canon 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 lens.
© Andrew and Allison McInnes/2AM Photography. All rights reserved.

 

The flowers are very dense and shockingly vivid against the soft colors of the leaves.

Silver Princess 2AM-29213.
(of the Eucalyptus genus)
Kings Park, Perth.
Canon 30D with Canon 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 lens.
© Andrew and Allison McInnes/2AM Photography. All rights reserved.

 

Flowers spent – all that remains…

Silver Princess 2AM-110836.
(of the Eucalyptus genus)
Kings Park, Perth.
Canon 7D with Canon 24-105mm f/4 lens.
© Andrew and Allison McInnes/2AM Photography. All rights reserved.

 

The bark of this tree species is stunning to me.

Silver Princess 2AM-110816.
(of the Eucalyptus genus)
Kings Park, Perth.
Canon 7D with Canon 24-105mm f/4 lens.
© Andrew and Allison McInnes/2AM Photography. All rights reserved.

 

 

Two days, two nights, and 942 miles in Central Texas.

‘Tis wildflower season in Texas! I was fortunate to have a few days and nights to spend traipsing around the Llano area. Truly beautiful, especially after the brutal drought of 2011. Thanks to Ken Zoller for his scouting and company during parts of this shoot.
Enjoy.

“Good Morning”
Enchanted Rock State Natural Area. Canon 7D with Canon 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 lens. f22 for 1/100 second, hand-held. ISO 400.
Copyright Andrew McInnes/2AM Photography – all rights reserved.

 

“Spiderwort”
Canon 30D with Canon 100-400mm f4.5-5.6 lens. f8 for 1/20 second and Kinko extension tubes, Manfrotto tripod and ball-head. ISO 400.
Copyright Andrew McInnes/2AM Photography – all rights reserved.

 

“Claret-cup cactus”
Canon 30D and Canon 100-400mm f4.5-5.6 lens and Kenko extension tubes. f11 for 1/4 seconds, Manfrotto tripod and ball-head. ISO 400.
Copyright Andrew McInnes/2AM Photography – all rights reserved.

 

“Bluebonnet Highway”
Canon 30D with Canon 100-400mm f4.5-5.6 lens. f8 for 1/400 second on Manfrotto tripod and ball-head. ISO 200.
Copyright Andrew McInnes/2AM Photography – all rights reserved.

 

“Rural Road”
Canon 7D with Canon 17-40mm f4 lens. f13 for 1/125 seconds, hand-held. ISO 200.
Copyright Andrew McInnes/2AM Photography – all rights reserved.

 

“Rusty Barn”
Canon 7D with Canon 17-40mm f/4 lens. f16 for 1/50 second, hand-held. ISO 100.
Copyright Andrew McInnes/2AM Photography – all rights reserved.

 

“Cactus and Bluebonnets”
Canon 30D with Canon 100-400mm f4.5-5.6 lens and Manfrotto tripod and ball-head. f11 for 1/8 second. ISO 200.
Copyright Andrew McInnes/2AM Photography – all rights reserved.

 

“Stone fence and Poppies”
Canon 7D and Canon 17-40mm f4 lens. f13 for 1/125 seconds, hand held. ISO 200.
Copyright Andrew McInnes/2AM Photography – all rights reserved.

 

“White Poppy”
Canon 30D with Canon 100-400mm f4-5.6 lens and Kenko extension tubes. f11 for 1/200 second, Manfrotto tripod and ball-head. ISO 200.
Copyright Andrew McInnes/2AM Photography – all rights reserved.

 

“Hay Baby, nice rack!”
Texas Longhorn cattle.
Canon 30D with Canon 100-400mm f4-5.6 lens. f7.1 for 1/100 second, Manfrotto tripod and ball-head. ISO 500.
Copyright Andrew McInnes/2AM Photography – all rights reserved.

 

“Unexpected Interaction”
Canon 30D with Canon 100-400mm f4.5-5.6 lens. f11 for 1/320 second, hand-held. ISO 400.
Copyright Andrew McInnes/2AM Photography – all rights reserved.

 

“Poppies and Fence”
Canon 7D with Canon 17-40mm f4 lens. f14 for 1/160 second, hand-held. ISO 100.
Copyright Andrew McInnes/2AM Photography – all rights reserved.

 

“Sandy Creek”
Canon 30D with Canon 100-400mm f4.5-5.6 lens. f7.1 for 1/40 second, hand-held. ISO 800.
Copyright Andrew McInnes/2AM Photography – all rights reserved.

 

“Stockyards” – a light-painting.
Canon 7D with Canon 10-22mm f3.5-4.5 lens. f4.5 for 51 seconds and Manfrotto tripod and ball-head. ISO 400.
Copyright Andrew McInnes/2AM Photography – all rights reserved.

 

 

Hope you liked the journey. My images are available through my website:
http://andrew-mcinnes.artistwebsites.com/

 

 

 

 

A bloody cold shoot in the mountains!

It having snowed the evening beforehand, I travelled into the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tennessee, for my first shoot of the new year, and my first ever snow-shoot. The thermometer read 18 F (-7.8 C); relative temperature (or “feels like”) was 6 F (-14 C). It definitely was brisk but a good learning experience shooting snow.

"Three shapes of water." Canon 30D with Canon EF100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L lens. f8 for 1/13 second at ISO 100.

 

"Shape morphing." Canon 30D with Canon EF100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L lens. f32 for 1.3 second at ISO 100.

 

"Ice balls and tites." Canon 30D with Canon EF100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L lens. f8 for 1/30 second at ISO 100.

 

"Balls of Moss." Canon 30D with Canon EF100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L lens. f20 for 1/3 second at ISO 100.

 

"Roaring Fork bridge." Canon 30D with Canon EF100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L lens. f13 for 1/6 second at ISO 100.

 

"Feel it." Canon 30D with Canon EF100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L lens. f22 for 1/2 second at ISO 100.

 

"Resilience." Canon 7D with Canon EF-S10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 lens. f22 for 0.8 second at ISO 100.

 

"Globular." Canon 30D with Canon EF100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L lens. f18 for 1/4 second at ISO 100.

 

"Slick bridge." Canon 7D with Canon EF-S10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 lens. f11 for 1/80 second at ISO 640 (handheld).

 

 

Fall Rotation – Thanksgiving 2011, Garner State Park, TX.

Had a wonderful several days at Garner State Park, Texas, where we reflected in nature on the immense blessing in our lives. The season provided a splendid variety of light, a foggy morn’, color on the Cypress trees, a dazzlingly clear calm evening for a North Star and rotation shot, and all-around pleasing to the eyes experience. Highly recommend Garner State Park (especially November).

“Cypress Stars.”
Light painting: Canon EOS 7D with Canon EF-S10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 lens. f4.5 for 72 seconds at ISO 2000.

 

“Reflecting on Thanksgiving.”
Light Panting: Canon EOS 7D with Canon EF-S10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 lens. f4.5 for 208 seconds at ISO 400.

 

“Garner Rocks.”
Light Panting: Canon EOS 7D with Canon EF-S10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 lens. f4.5 for 46 seconds at ISO 1000.

 

“Partial Pinwheel.”
Canon EOS 7D with Canon EF-S10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 lens. f4.5 for 1298 seconds at ISO 400.

 

“Foggy Fall Foliage.”
Canon EOS 30D with Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L lens. f/14 for 1/13 second at ISO 200.

 

“Foggy Frio #1.”
Canon EOS 30D with Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L lens. f/14 for 1/25 second at ISO 200.

 

“Foggy Frio #2.”
Canon EOS 30D with Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L lens. f/14 for 1/13 second at ISO 200.

 

“Foggy Frio #3.”
Canon EOS 30D with Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L lens. f/14 for 1/25 second at ISO 200.

 

“Foggy Frio #4.”
Canon EOS 7D with Canon EF 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 lens. f/10 for 1/30 second at ISO 100.

 

“Foggy Frio #5.”
Canon EOS 7D with Canon EF 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 lens. f/10 for 1/60 second at ISO 100.

 

“Foggy Frio #6.”
Canon EOS 7D with Canon EF 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 lens. f/10 for 1/50 second at ISO 100.

 

“Fall on the Frio.”
Canon EOS 7D with Canon EF 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 lens. f/11 for 1/50 second at ISO 100.

 

“Fall on the Frio #2.”
Canon EOS 7D with Canon EF 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 lens. f/11 for 1/30 second at ISO 100.

 

“Stormy mornin’.”
Canon EOS 7D with Canon EF 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 lens. f/11 for 1/8 second at ISO 250.

 

 

 

Serenity in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park

A brief vacation in Tennessee enabled me time to go “shoot” and yielded some images from a quaint stream – well, it is named the “Roaring Fork” but was in a non-roaring flow when I explored it. Hope you find peace and solace through these sample images.

Dusk falls over the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Canon 7D with Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L lens at ISO 100.

 

“Reflections on a stream #1.” Canon 7D with Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L lens at ISO 100.

 

Fungi thriving in moist, cool, shaded environment. Canon 7D with Canon EF-S 10-22 mm f/3.5-4.5 lens at ISO 100.

 

Moss, water, and quite ambience. Canon 7D with Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 lens at ISO 400.

 

Mossy boulders and stream. Canon 7D with Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 lens at ISO 400.

 

Cold water trickling and descending. Canon 7D and Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 lens at ISO 250.

 

“Meandering among metamorphics #1.” Canon 7D with Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 lens at ISO 100.

 

Cool, moist habitat and moss flourishes. Canon 7D with Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 lens at ISO 100.

 

“Metamorphic meanderings #1.” Canon 7D with Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 lens at ISO 100.

 

“Tranquility above Dali.” Canon 7D with Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 lens at ISO 100.

 

“Tranquility, sans Dali.” Canon 7D with Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 lens at ISO 100.

 

“Reflections on a stream #2.” Canon 7D with Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 lens at ISO 100.

 

“More metamorphic meanderings.” Canon 7D with Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 lens at ISO 100.

 

“Flowers and falls.” Canon 7D with Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 lens at ISO 400.

 

 

 

The “Roaring Lion” (Brazos River) is dry!

A southern plains dawn - radiating radiation above a wheat field abutting the Brazos riparian zone.


As the sun awakes
 and pokes its head out from under its bedcovers, caressing me with a startling, crisp, and clear light, I ponder and reflect on open spaces, friends, dreams, and the joy of a life intimately shared.

I recently travelled up to the upper section of the Brazos River to photograph it in its current very-low-flow regime. My host and guide was the fabulous photographer, and Texas treasure, Wyman Meinzer. This sunrise image was taken on our last morning shoot. I was very fortunate to test my latest lens, the Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM autofocus lens for my 7D camera – I am delighted with it!

The following images are a sample through which the severity of this historic drought can be partially comprehended. Seeing the river in this state illustrated that these natural systems are indeed “living”, and not a static, benign, undepletable featureless feature.

Please note: the water shown in these photos are actually isolated, shallow, and unconnected “pockets” of very hot, highly saline, and by my estimation hypoxic/anoxic stagnant water. The river no-longer (for now at least) cuts a swath through this gorgeous red land. Instead of a red load we see a red-bed caked and crusted with concentrations of organics and crystals of salt – this is gypsum country.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Despite the dry
I am reminded that nature possesses a resounding resilience; natural processes and time, along with selection pressures and genetic diversity, allow adaptability, specialists and generalists, transition, recolonization, and succession – the river system still sustains life.

 

 

 


Someday
(hopefully very soon as many fine hard-working folks, along with flora and fauna, are enduring challenging times) the Brazos will rear up and roar again; at that time the rust colored strata will cease to be dust, instead, renewed by glistening life-flows, the southern plains shall be resuscitated and exuberant in the water of life.

 

 

May 11-22, 2011: The Junction experience with Wyman Meinzer

Two weeks based out of the Texas Tech University campus at Junction, Texas, shooting with Wyman Meinzer and others. Conditions are very dry yet beauty abounds. What follows is a sample of the images captured from various locales visited.


Day 1: 05/12/2011

Started out up nice and close with a western diamondback rattlesnake.

 

Then off to “paint” a Church at night. Wyman does all the work and we just compose and shoot the image. This image was actually taken pre-painting, as there was a pretty sunset and the “street” light (on left, out of frame) was providing sufficient light on the left to balance the sunset light on the right.
Day 2: 05/13/2011
Morning shoot of rapids on the Upper Llano River.

 

Evening shoot on the Llano River.

 

 

 

Day 3: 05/14/2011
More Llano River images – this time from the gorgeous property of artist Bill Worrell.

 

 

These next few images were taken with moonlight – a wet and chilly shoot.

 

 

 

This next series is from a different location on the same river.

 

 

 

Day 4: 05/15/2011
Mason Mountain Wildlife Management Area – a very dry though still magnificent location.

Three looks at prickly pear cactus:

 

 

 

Dusk

 

And then it was dark…
another “painting” – Wyman was running back and forth in the dark and somehow didn’t fall whilst painting.

 

Day 5: 05/16/2011
The following flower images were captured at Native American Seed company.

 

 

Church at dusk – another splendid paintjob by Wyman Meinzer.

 

 

Day 6: 05/17/2011
Independence Creek Preserve is a holding of The Nature Conservancy. The artesian spring contributes significantly to the Pecos River. The riparian area is truly in contrast to the desert region surrounding it.

The following two images are of a Round-tailed Horned Lizard.

 

 

Here is a Black-chinned Hummingbird:

 

and here are some black-tailed prairie dogs:

 

 


Day 7: 05/18/2011

A typical scene at Independence Creek.

 

and another:

 

This scene is a result of a beaver dam on a seep that feeds into the main creek:
Day 8: 05/19/2011

More “typical” views:

 

 

 

Day 9: 05/20/2011

Back at Junction. New bridge leading to the Texas Tech at Junction campus painted by who else but Wyman:

 

Another night shoot so captured these oaks at dusk:
Day 10: 05/21/2011

Back to 377 Falls.

 

 

 

 

 

Day 11: 05/22/2011

Sabinal River near Utopia.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Day 12: 05/23/2011
A morning shoot – Portrait work – in a feedstore warehouse with natural light.
“Wild Dave” was the first model:

 

 

Then Maddee:

 

Then back to Bill Worrell’s property on the Llano River for an evening shoot:

 

 

 


Day 13: 05/24/2011
This morning we visited a ranch to image more western diamondback rattlesnakes:

 

 

Evening shoot at Fort McKavett – time to ponder the past and the lives of folks back then:

 

Then another “painting” by Wyman:

 

After the shoot Wyman and “Wild Dave” wanted to refine a shot they had planned of Wyman “painting”. As they were practicing the shot I grabbed an opportunity shot which changed the approach of the final shot. Here is that first “inspiration” image:

 

After Wyman and Dave saw the image, we three, along with Trevor White, began to discuss how to create the final image. What follows is the image we decided on shooting (all light painting by Wyman Meinzer):
Day 14: 05/25/2011
Back to Native American Seed farm – the breeze came up making macro work very challenging so I switched to capturing zoom-blur images instead:

 

 

 

We ventured back to Mason Mountain Wildlife Management Area for our last evening – a time to shoot, visit, and enjoy our last evening as a group. Frienship abounds.

 


Day 15: 05/26/2011
The final shoot was an opportunistic one of a water moccasin and patchnose snake:

 

 

 

So long from Junction.